• Upcoming trips

    Feb 3 - Feb 13 Caribbean cruise May 1 to May 14 London vacation. (Hotels and details later). Hope to see you all then.
  • theatre and Concerrts

    December 7. Went to the Met to see the abridged version of “The Magic Flute”. We have seen this production before and still the charm of the great puppet characters keeps the children in awe and their parents happy with their parenting. An amusing interlude.

    December 9. Saw the Manhattan School of Music’s production of “Cendrillon” by Nicolo Isouard at the Florence Gould Hall. The MSM is having both its concert halls renovated and is using outside premises like the Alliance Francaise’s hall. The School and its talented young students put everything they have into this production; Scenery, lighting, costumes and acting was superb. As was the directing and conducting. Refreshing also, was that the cast was of the age to be convincing in their parts.

    December 10. The first of the “Peoples Symphony Concerts” this season (Their 118th year!). “The Variation String Trio” did the honours accompanied by guest pianist: Orion Weiss. Their programme included a new work by Nina Young (b.1984) Very interesting, but not, I think, a world-beater.

    December 31 Went to the Kaye theatre at Hunter College  to see the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players’ production of “H.M.S. Pinafore”. Cast and orchestra captured the high spirits of the musical romp and the sets were surprisingly professional. Reminded me of the old Sadlers’ Wells days,

    January 2, 2018. Saw the Met’s “The Merry Widow”. During the first act, the acoustics left a lot to be desired and words were difficult to hear, even in English. But all went well in the second and third acts; the Russian style dancing was rousing and the sets were spectacular. There are usually only six ‘Grisettes’ (Can-can girls) on a regular stage, but the Met’s vast space seemed to be full of them; three, even, descending from the top of the proscenium arch! All with their frilly knickers a-shaking

     

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Museum mile – The artist and his model

Every year, the museums on Fifth Avenue (The Museum Mile) hold an open evening for all-comers. The Avenue is closed to traffic for the occasion and cases of coloured chalk are provided so that frustrated New Yorkers of all ages can vent their artistic yearnings on the unsuspecting tarmac.

The event is always oversubscribed and the line for each museum snakes around its respective block. Christine and I attached ourselves to the Cooper Hewitt line because neither of us had seen the inside since the start of the two-three year make-over which has just been completed. (The garden, where Ethel and I spent countless serene hours, is still not open, though).

We took a whirlwind tour of several galleries and my impression was one of chaos; like the Sir John Soanes museum in London, not an inch of wall or floor is  left without an artifact or exhibit occupying it! It could be that this  impression was largely due to the crush of people. There were many exhibits of interest which I would like to see in depth and, since I am a member of the Smithsonian, of which, the Cooper Hewitt is a branch, I will be able to view  them later when the museum is not under siege.

One happening of note this year was an artist (whose name I couldn’t get because of the crush of photographers around him)  painting his model (literally) on the sidewalk outside the Guggenheim! I fought for shots along with the best of them; not as successfully as I would have liked, but you can judge for yourselves from the sequence I have posted in this blog.

On the way to Fifth Avenue, this tent was set up in the street  opposite The Cooper Hewitt and a stylish wedding  reception was just breaking up . . . .

On the way to Fifth Avenue, this tent was set up in the street opposite The Cooper Hewitt and a stylish wedding reception was just breaking up . . . .

 . . . . on the way back, a man was lying on the ground by these tables and an ambulance was screeching is way to the scene. I was not the groom I understood.

. . . . on the way back, a man was lying on the ground by these tables and an ambulance was screeching is way to the scene. It was not the Groom I understood.

 . . . . encouraging mums and dads watched while their kids enjoyed the unexpected freedom . . . .

. . . . encouraging mums and dads watched while their kids enjoyed the unexpected freedom . . . .

The object is to use up as much chalk as possible in the allotted two hours . . . .

The object is to use up as much chalk as possible in the allotted two hours . . . .

 . . . . . .

. . . . . .

 . . . . . .

. . . . . .

One of the design exhibits in the Cooper Hewitt . . . .

One of the design exhibits in the Cooper Hewitt . . . .

 . . . . .Fabric designs

. . . . .Fabric designs

 . . . favours and  . . .

. . . favours and . . .

 . . .and funny hats were part of the fun.

. . .and funny hats were part of the fun.

. . . . . I wish I could have taken note of the artist’s name; I would be interested in seeing his other works. He was lucky in finding such a brave model for this public work!

Blasé New Yorkers passed by with hardly a look when the artist first started work . . . .

Blasé New Yorkers passed by with hardly a look when the artist first started work . . . .

 . . . . .  then the I-phone crowd descended upon the scene and it was every man for himself !

. . . . . then the I-phone crowd descended upon the scene and it was every man for himself !

finishing touches

finishing touches

 . . . . detail . . . .

. . . . detail . . . .

 . . . . . .

. . . . . .

 . . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

 . . the brush tickles a bit . . .

. . the brush tickles a bit . . .

 . . .quite a lot sometimes . . .

. . .quite a lot sometimes . . .

Orange ear!

Orange ear!

The finished work. (NOT for sale!)

The finished work. (NOT for sale!)

Click on the images for greater detail.

 

 

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