• Upcoming trips

    Feb 3 - Feb 13 Caribbean cruise May 1 to May 14 London vacation. (Hotels and details later). Hope to see you all then.
  • theatre and Concerrts

    December 7. Went to the Met to see the abridged version of “The Magic Flute”. We have seen this production before and still the charm of the great puppet characters keeps the children in awe and their parents happy with their parenting. An amusing interlude.

    December 9. Saw the Manhattan School of Music’s production of “Cendrillon” by Nicolo Isouard at the Florence Gould Hall. The MSM is having both its concert halls renovated and is using outside premises like the Alliance Francaise’s hall. The School and its talented young students put everything they have into this production; Scenery, lighting, costumes and acting was superb. As was the directing and conducting. Refreshing also, was that the cast was of the age to be convincing in their parts.

    December 10. The first of the “Peoples Symphony Concerts” this season (Their 118th year!). “The Variation String Trio” did the honours accompanied by guest pianist: Orion Weiss. Their programme included a new work by Nina Young (b.1984) Very interesting, but not, I think, a world-beater.

    December 31 Went to the Kaye theatre at Hunter College  to see the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players’ production of “H.M.S. Pinafore”. Cast and orchestra captured the high spirits of the musical romp and the sets were surprisingly professional. Reminded me of the old Sadlers’ Wells days,

    January 2, 2018. Saw the Met’s “The Merry Widow”. During the first act, the acoustics left a lot to be desired and words were difficult to hear, even in English. But all went well in the second and third acts; the Russian style dancing was rousing and the sets were spectacular. There are usually only six ‘Grisettes’ (Can-can girls) on a regular stage, but the Met’s vast space seemed to be full of them; three, even, descending from the top of the proscenium arch! All with their frilly knickers a-shaking

     

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Macy’s Fireworks and memories

When I was an urchin of ten or so, I remember begging my mother to let me have some discarded clothes for Guy Fawkes day, the fifth of November. I would sew or wire the jacket and trousers together and stuff the result with old newspapers. For the face, I’d buy a ha’penny mask, with an elastic band attached, from the sweet shop around the corner. Then I would ball up some more newspaper to the appropriate size and slip the elastic band over it to hold the mask in place. If no cloth cap was available for burning, I would fashion a pirate’s hat out of newspaper and stick that on top of the balled-up paper head.

Incongruous , or not, the resulting effigy satisfied my entrepreurnial requirements so I pinned a notice to its jacket, penned in my best handwriting; “A Penny for the Guy”. If I remember correctly, there was a perambulator at 57 Kimberly Avenue available for the borrowing at that time and I trundled my Guy Fawkes in it to Seven Kings railway station and touted for fireworks money. I would garner, perhaps, as much as ten pence on a good day–as well as a good deal of ridicule from younger passers-by. In those days, small bangers cost a ha’penny, larger ones a penny and canons cost as much as tuppence! Similarly, Catharine wheels cost a ha’penny, a penny or two pence according to size. Keeping my purchases to the cheapest offerings, I was able to acquire a respectable number of fireworks with which to impress (and, perhaps, scare) my school-mates.

My father, who shared my youthful delight in making things go “BANG” and the traditional burning at the stake of historical effigies, supervised the ordained destruction of my handiwork. He would stick an old broomstick into the ground in the garden, then tie my Guy to it and pile twisted newspapers and firewood at its newspaper feet. When family and friends were properly  gathered around, he would pour some paraffin on the pile and, from a safe distance, throw a lighted match at it.

The resulting roar of the flames engulfing my artwork  gave rise to as many involuntary ooh’s and ah’s as I remember at any official display I have seen since! My father usually bought the family a box of fireworks to be let off while the guy was burning. It included one or two rockets, which he fired from empty milk bottles, which would reach an incredible 30 feet up into the air, streaming a trail of golden sparks behind them. Then there were ‘jack-in-the boxes’, ‘Vesuvius’s’ and ‘jumping crackers’ to frighten the ladies with. Heaven on earth for little boys!

Like cigarettes today, fireworks were considered hazardous to one’s health and carried a warning. Quaintly it read: “Light the blue touch paper and retire immediately”! Very few of we onlookers were old enough to retire so we stood where we were, prepared, though, to jump back smartly if any sparks came our way.

The ha’penny days are long gone! I watched Macy’s firework extravaganza from the roof of the Waterford on Tuesday–60,000 rockets  at an average cost of $1,000 apiece were fired into the sky for half-an-hour or more. Very impressive. But I still preferred lighting my own ha’penny bangers!

Enlarge the pictures for best viewing:

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THE FINALE

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 Responses

  1. Thanks for sharing your story… I too would have liked to see your “guy” light up… I kinda think yours better and funnier than Macy’s. Thanks again for sharing. Nereida

  2. Nereida. Many thanks. Although there were none of the electronic marvels that exist today and none of the rights–I still think that the children of my day enjoyed a simple happiness far beyond that possible for those in the current stress-filled society.

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