• Upcoming trips

    September 7 to 15 Tony and Jo will visit us from the UK

    13-23 January, 2018 Cruise out of New York around the Caribbean on the Norwegian Gem

  • theatre and Concerrts

    June 9 Christine  lined up for tickets to the Public’s production of “Julius Caesar” in Central Park. This politicized version sported a look-alike Trump as Caesar, hoards of frenetic protesters and a slight female (with no Shakespearian diction) as the wily Marc Antony. But where oh where was the Shakespeare? The highlight of the event was, for me, the sight of an impudent baby raccoon wandering around the apron of the stage!

    June 11 Saw “Cost of Living” at the Manhattan Theatre Club. Wonderfully acted by the four-member cast, the play concerns two couples; one, a caregiver and a double amputee and the other a caregiver and a paraplegic. The scene-changing  accommodates the two wheelchairs very well but the multiplicity of the changes required, makes the story line difficult to follow.
    June  Barbara managed to get 3 seats  in the 59e59th theatre to see “Invincible” by Torben Betts. It is a British story about two neighbouring couples meeting socially for the first time. One couple is  young, avant-garde and activist and the other is typically London east-end. The four actors are marvelous in their parts and the writing of the characters is supurb.

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Odd-Mod at the Whitney

Thanks to my good friend, Barbara, we were able to  see the Whitney museum’s exhibit for the “Whitney Biennial 2017”. It is a vast exhibit which would take several visits to do it justice. In our case, we spent valuable time having a leisurely lunch on the Whitney’s top balcony in between art-gazing. Modern art seems to me to be taking a new direction; it is getting away from geometrical shapes and minimalist placement of objects at strange angles and trending towards complicated tangles of stuff which the layman’s’ mind’s eye has to work hard in order to  unravel. Click on the picture for detail :

start unravelling . . .

 

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. . .where does it begin? . . .

 

. . . tiled closet . . .

 

.  . .  display shelves . . .

 

. . . a right tangle, this . . .

 

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back to strategic placement . . .

 

 . . . anatomical . . .

 

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Multi-mirrored view down to the first floor . . .

 

tangle of figures and electronic screen on a turn-table. . . .

 

?

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Ukraine in New York

Following a tip Christine received from one of her Ukrainian  customers, we bussed down to 7th Street and Second Avenue to see the Ukrainian Festival which was in progress. A very pleasant surprise for me was that we came upon a resuscitated McSoreleys Ale Bar which I was sure had gone out business decades earlier. It was one of the world-renowned places I was determined to see when I first came to the USA–at that time, women were not allowed in and substantial bar-top snacks were free for drinking customers. Today they serve two very good craft ales, one light and one dark and you get a mug of each when you order. It was impressive to see the bustling waiters carrying eight mugs in one hand without spilling a precious drop! The Festival food offerings were not the usual Street fare. Christine selected a couple of native dishes: Varenyk (a crescent shaped potato dumpling) and  Holubets ( stuffed cabbage with meat and rice).  She said they were alright but not as good as her mothers’. The entertainment was provided by a number of practiced and energetic dance groups and was exciting to watch.

Click on the pictures for the best detail:

Centre of the Ukraine community in New York

 

Christine dressed for the occasion . . .

Ukrainian accessories . . . .

Street shopper . . .

Native dresses on sale . . .

 

. . . another shopper . . .

This tiny Ukrainian-American is getting his first selfie . . .

 

The dance commences . . .

 

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The exuberance was contagious . . .

 

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The young troupes were serious about their role . .  .

 

. . . and so were the very young ones . . .

 

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Gymnastic leaps . . .

 

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Very talented 11-year-old . . .

 

Principal dancer . . . .

 

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Finale . . .

 

Ukrainian symbols . . .

 

After lunch we went back into McSorleys and savoured two more ales apiece!

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Q line bonus

Spring has uncovered a special treat  for we Waterford dwellers! The restoration of Second Avenue after the subway construction included the replacement of ordinary Sweet Locust trees with three spectacular Eastern Redbuds. Here are pictures of them with their blossoms glued to the branches as is their nature (no leaves yet). New York City bees are having a field day!

Eastern Redbud . . . .

 

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Great New York Day! – The Second Avenue Subway opens!

The trains will not be running until New Year’s eve but the Stations are open for viewing. Yesterday the MTA held an open day at the 96th Street station. I missed the dignitaries at the opening but I did get a souvenir tee shirt and a cookie! I was able to walk around at leisure on the mezzanine and track levels and also try out the 94th Street escalators. Click on the pictures for detail:

All come to the party!

All come to the party!

 

The main entrance

The main entrance

 

The crowd was well guarded

The crowd was well guarded

 

Descending the Main entrance escalators for the first time . . . .

Descending the Main entrance escalators for the first time . . . .

 

Looking back up . . . .

Looking back up . . . .

 

SONY DSC . . . . . .

View of the track level from the mezzanine . .

View of the track level from the mezzanine . .

 

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Down to the track level . . .

Down to the track level . . .

 

The track - Nobody kept away from the yellow stripe today!

The track – Nobody kept away from the yellow stripe today!

 

The new subway map . . .

The new subway map . . .

 

SONY DSC

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The artists involved . . . . .

The artists involved . . . . .

 

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94th Street exit, sw corner . .

94th Street exit, sw corner . .

 

94th Streer exit, NE corner

94th Street exit, NE corner

 

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We salute them all - but, after six years of devastated streets, uprooted trees and treacherous sidewalks, we are glad thteir task is finished!

We salute them all – but, after six years of devastated streets, uprooted trees and treacherous sidewalks, we are glad their task is finished!

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Toy Trains in Grand Central

For the Christmas season, the Transit Museum has open a small branch in the depths of Grand Central station. If they could only avoid the hoards of little kids running around in delight,  we men would have the time of our lives.

Click on the pictures for detail:

Christine bought a cutout book for her little nephew, Mikey

Christine bought a cutout book for her little nephew, Mikey

 

Grand Central in miiature

Grand Central in miniature

 

Elevated subway track .. . . .

Elevated subway track .. . . .

 

surface track   . . . .

surface track . . . .

 

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Notice the little crowd of people waving goodbye!

 

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River boats are included

River boats are included

 

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Montauk

Christine and I took  three days out last month to do some fishing out of Montauk. We were hoping to take the night fishing trip to catch some striped bass and cod to fill our refrigerators. Montauk is a two-plus hours drive from Manhattan and we arrived there in the early afternoon on a Tuesday–the one day the night-fishing boat didn’t go out! Instead, we booked a full day’s outing on a party boat the next day, fishing for flounder, porgies and sea bass. When we arrived at the dock at 7 a.m., The boat was already crowded with seasoned fishermen with their own sophisticated equipment and occupying the best places on the rail for their rods.

One of the ship’s mates forced a somewhat cramped space for us amidships.  We paid our pool money but had no hope of competing with the habitués. We did, however, catch enough reasonably sized porgies and sea bass to take back and enjoy at home. The few flounders we caught were thrown back dismissively by the crew as being under regulation size–I personally thought they would have made very good eating.

Here are the few incidental pictures I took during the trip. Click on them for detail:

 

We spent our spare time looking at the sights of Montauk including The Lighthouse State Park. Christine is resting up before climbing the rocks

We spent our spare time looking at the sights of Montauk including the Lighthouse State Park. Christine is resting up before climbing the rocks

 

The Lighthouse Museum

The Lighthouse Museum

 

Christine about to climb the rocks . . .

Christine about to climb the rocks . . .

 

some of the larger fish we encountered . . . .

some of the larger fish we encountered . . . .

 

Frisky stallions in the corral . . .

Frisky stallion in the corral . . .

 

A Hamptons craftwork.

A Hamptons craftwork.

 

View of the setting sun from my apartment as we were eating the Sea Bass!

View of the setting sun from my apartment as we were eating the Sea Bass!

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Governor’s Island

Christine  and I thought we might take a look at the changes to Governor’s Island since the City bought it from the Coast Guard for $1. We joined a long line for the GI Ferry but it didn’t take long to get through the ticket office  to the waiting area–pleasant surprise! Fare is only $1 return for Seniors. For entertainment there was a very loud Rock band and great fun dodging the cycling crowd. Christine managed to get a free glass of a local craft ale for us–which, in the heat of the day, was most acceptable. There was not much to see; the old 9-hole golf course  which I played many years ago is now an island fair with municipal and commercial stalls. But, the Island does offer some of the most spectacular views of New York harbor: Click on the pictures for best detail:

Approaching the Island with the Brooklyn skyline as a backdrop

Approaching the Island with the Brooklyn skyline as a backdrop

 

The old familiar dock

The old familiar dock

 

Waiting to get off . . .

Waiting to get off . . .

 

. . . . waiting to get on

. . . . waiting to get on

 

View of Manhattan from the GI dock

View of Manhattan from the GI dock

 

Substantial buffer . . .

Substantial buffer . . .

 

Tranquility in the bustling East River . .

Tranquility in the bustling East River . .

 

Sad reminder of past glories

Sad reminder of past glories

 

The World One tower framed in the Island's trees . . .

The World One tower framed in the Island’s trees . . .

 

Picnic view . . .

Picnic view . . .

 

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Public transport depot

Public transport depot

 

Sitting in the shade for a bit . . . .

Sitting in the shade for a bit . . . .

 

 . . . our final view from the island.

. . . our final view from the island.

 

THE END OF THE POST